AIDS Is Going to Lose

So do 27,614 others.

What Chevron Is Doing

We partner with local businesses in Nigeria to send peer educators into the community to teach HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention.

Download Transcript (29 KB)

See who agrees.

Michel Sidibé

Michel Sidibé

Executive Director

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)

The world has an unprecedented opportunity to eliminate new HIV infections among children.

In 2009, approximately 370,000 children around the world became infected with HIV, and as many as 60,000 pregnant women died because of HIV. In contrast, high-income countries reported virtually no new HIV infections among children or maternal and child deaths due to HIV. In low- and middle-income countries, too few pregnant women have access to prevention and treatment services that could protect themselves and their families from HIV.

Institutions, NGOs and companies such as Chevron are working to address that need. At the United Nations General Assembly High Level Meeting on AIDS in 2011, world leaders committed to eliminating new HIV infections in children and keeping their mothers alive by 2015. UNAIDS is pleased to have Chevron as a partner in this effort.

Rhonda I. Zygocki

Rhonda I. Zygocki

Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning

Chevron

We've been fighting AIDS for nearly 30 years.

Since the 1980s, AIDS has devastated areas Chevron calls home—from San Francisco to sub-Saharan Africa. In response, Chevron joined 13 other San Francisco Bay Area companies in 1986 to promote HIV/AIDS education in the workplace.

In 2005, Chevron was the first oil and gas company to implement a global HIV/AIDS policy, requiring education, prevention and access to treatment programs across the company’s worldwide operations.

We share our training program with suppliers and health care centers. We even partner with several governments, nongovernmental organizations and other companies to share our best practices in fighting this relentless disease.

In 2011, Chevron embarked on a mission to help prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) through partnerships with Pact, Born Free Africa (BFA) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (The Global Fund) in Angola, Nigeria, and South Africa.

Since then, we have achieved remarkable results. In Bayelsa state, Nigeria, nearly 500 individuals have been trained on the latest PMTCT approaches and techniques through our partnership with Pact. By working with Born Free Africa, we’ve helped 166,487 pregnant women get tested for HIV in Nigeria. Chevron also partners with The Global Fund, directing $60 million to programs that have contributed to 8.7 million lives saved.

After nearly 30 years of fighting AIDS, I wish I could say we've won the battle. Or even that the end is in sight. We still have a long journey ahead, but we must acknowledge the tremendous strides that we have made in our fight so far. One day, we'll defeat AIDS—in our workplace, in our homes, our communities and our nations. But we'll only do it by working together.