Chevron continues its commitment to understanding and evaluating the economic viability of renewable-energy sources, including solar, wind, geothermal and biofuels. We conduct internal research and collaborate with governments, businesses and academia in researching and developing alternative and renewable-energy sources.

solar

solar

Chevron’s photovoltaic projects at Questa, New Mexico, and in the San Joaquin Valley, California, test and evaluate solar technologies. Project Brightfield, in Bakersfield, California, has evaluated seven photovoltaic technologies to determine the potential application of renewable power at other company-owned facilities. Chevron has also invested in five joint venture photovoltaic solar facilities, in California, Arizona and Texas, which, at peak capacity, generate a combined 73 megawatts of renewable energy, or enough electricity to power approximately 60,000 homes for a year.

wind

wind

Our Casper Wind Farm, commissioned in 2009, has turned a former refinery site near Casper, Wyoming, into an 11-turbine, 16.5 megawatt–capacity wind farm, which, at peak capacity, produces enough electricity to power approximately 13,000 U.S. homes for a year.

geothermal

geothermal

In 2012, Chevron invested in a 49 megawatt–capacity joint venture geothermal facility in California that produces enough electricity to power approximately 40,000 U.S. homes for a year.

biofuels

biofuels

Chevron believes advanced biofuels can help meet the world’s future energy needs if they are scalable, sustainable and affordable for consumers. That is why Chevron is working to develop solutions that meet those criteria under an effective policy framework.

Chevron is actively evaluating options for biomass processing as part of our transportation fuels businesses, particularly in California. To date, our work, as well as that of others, to produce second-generation biofuels that are economical at scale without subsidies has not been successful. This included creating a joint venture with Weyerhaeuser, then the largest landowner in the United States, to try to commercialize cellulosic biofuels. We are exploring leveraging our current manufacturing facilities to produce biofuels along with our traditional petroleum products.

renewablediesel

renewable diesel

Biofuels that complement conventional transportation fuels, such as renewable diesel, can play an important role in reducing the carbon intensity of transportation fuels while meeting the world’s growing energy needs. Renewable diesel, also known as biomass-based diesel, is a hydrocarbon diesel vehicle fuel produced from nonpetroleum renewable resources such as vegetable oils (soy, corn, canola, etc.), animal and poultry fat, used cooking oil, municipal solid waste, and wastewater sludges and oils. In 2017, Chevron began to distribute diesel fuel containing between 6 and 20 percent renewable diesel from some of our California fuel terminals.