one future, many routes

As we look toward tomorrow, how can we reduce transportation emissions? Many lower carbon energy solutions — enabled to scale by well-designed policies — are needed to make meaningful progress for us all.

conventional engines need unconventional solutions

the challenge 27 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions came from conventional transportation in 2020

our solutionwe’re shifting how transportation is fueled

Reaching global net zero emissions is no small feat. Chevron is working with partners to help create a range of viable renewable fuels as both drop-ins and full substitutions for existing fuels. And they’re making an impact.

trucking

Lowering carbon intensity of existing fleets with renewable fuels.

automotive

Developing affordable, reliable and ever-cleaner fuels for the road.

aviation

Producing renewable fuels for sustainable skies.

marine

Reducing CO2 emissions for open water lanes.

rail

Working toward lower rail emissions with bio-based diesel and hydrogen.

Chevron is committed to offering the lower carbon solutions our customers demand. Our partnerships, projects and fuel advancements all drive toward that end: progress today toward transportation for tomorrow.

Andy Walz

President of Americas Products, Chevron

biofeedstockscultivating affordable, reliable and ever-cleaner energy

The shift to high-quality, lower carbon fuels depends on energy-intense biofeedstocks. In 2021, we used 15 different biofeedstock types and continue to work alongside agricultural suppliers and allies. Together, we can build supply chains that keep waste materials out of landfills. We can increase crop yields. And, we can contribute to the development of next-gen energy long into the future.

soybean oil

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soybean oil

We use energy-dense soybean oil for various industrial applications and to produce bio-based diesel. As part of a new joint venture with Bunge, Chevron is establishing a reliable supply chain from farmer to fueling station.

peanuts

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peanuts

They’re not only good for trail mix. Peanuts helped revolutionize the transportation sector, with their oil fueling the world’s first diesel engine. Today, Chevron is collaborating with scientists at Texas A&M AgriLife to explore peanut oil as a renewable biofeedstock.

inedible animal fats

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inedible animal fats

While certain animal fats such as beef tallow, pork grease and chicken fat aren’t great for eating, they can be used to create renewable fuel. With a limited market and a lower cost, Chevron is using fats like these to produce high-quality bio-based diesel.

distillers corn oil

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distillers corn oil

During corn ethanol production, corn is fermented and the ethanol is boiled off. The remaining distilled mixture can be processed into one of the lowest-rated carbon intensity feedstocks available. We then use it to produce bio-based diesel.

cover crops

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cover crops

Chevron has invested in CoverCress International to create a lower carbon intensity oil feedstock from cover crops that can be grown between rotations of corn and soy. These cover crops can benefit the land and supplement farm incomes.

used cooking oil

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used cooking oil

A use for fryer oil that goes way beyond making fries. The product of a variety of vegetable oils and animal fats, used cooking oil that can swamp landfills is instead collected. We then use it to create bio-based diesel.

canola oil

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canola oil

Similar to soybean oil, canola oil is a premium feedstock that comes from the seeds of the canola plant. It can be used in oleochemicals for various industrial applications. Chevon uses it to produce high-quality bio-based diesel.

policy positionprogress toward a lower carbon road ahead

We support policies that guide the scaling of lower carbon intensity solutions for the transportation sector. Because creating fewer transportation emissions today puts us on the road to a lower carbon future.