press release

TEXACO SPONSORS RITMOS DE IDENTIDAD A CELEBRATION OF LATIN MUSIC AND CULTURE

FOR RELEASE: MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2000.

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 28 - Texaco celebrates the energy of Latin music and culture as the presenting sponsor of Ritmos de Identidad. This dynamic exhibit is comprised of 100 traditional and contemporary hand-made secular and sacred percussion instruments from the U.S., Caribbean, and Central and South America. Ritmos de Identidad will be on display at the Smithsonian Institution, Arts & Industries Building in Washington, DC from February 29th to August 1, 2000, before moving on to the Historical Museum of Southern Florida located in Miami in September.

"Music is a product of our heritage, a cultural phenomenon that possesses the unique ability to shape both history and identity. Texaco is proud to sponsor Ritmos de Identidad," said Michael Treviño, Texaco General Manager, Public and Government Affairs. "This exhibit uniquely illustrates the importance and influence of Latino music worldwide."

With the stories of Fernando Ortiz and Dr. Joseph Howard at the heart of this exhibit, Ritmos de Identidad takes audiences on a powerful journey that honors Hispanic culture, family, unity and ancestry. Texaco's sponsorship of Ritmos de Identidad is a part of the company's ongoing recognition of the cultural and educational role that music plays in everyone's lives.

Texaco has a rich history of supporting the arts, including a 60-year sponsorship of the radio broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera. Through its signature program, Early Notes: The Sounds of Children Learning, the Texaco Foundation supports projects that build collaborative relationships between schools and music programs and community resources with a focus on the earliest school years.

Operating in more than 150 countries, Texaco and its affiliates explore for, find and produce oil and natural gas; manufacture and market high-quality fuels and lubricant products; operate trading, transportation and distribution facilities; and produce alternate forms of energy for power, manufacturing and chemicals.

Updated: February 2000