West coast decommissioning program

featurewest coast decommissioning program

In the first of its kind in federal waters off the coast of California, Chevron will be going to record-breaking depths to complete the decommissioning of five oil platforms, with the highest priority on the safety of the workforce and the protection of the environment and communities.

Chevron is leading a team of partners in the first-ever decommissioning project in federal waters off the coast of California — a project that will break records for the deepest full removal platform decommissioning of an oil platform in U.S federal waters.

Like any Chevron effort, the highest priority of the West Coast Decommissioning Program is the health and safety of the workers as well as the protection of the environment and nearby communities. This means working hand-in-hand with local, state and federal governments, along with numerous regulatory agencies.

decommissioning process

The West Coast Decommissioning Program is an extraordinary undertaking that will take precise planning and seamless coordination with integral partners. At each step, Chevron’s highest priorities are the safety of all workers and the protection of the environment and communities we serve. Three platforms will break the record for deepest full removal platform decommissioning in U.S. federal waters.
decommissioning process

Platform Gail

739’ depth | 37,057 tons

Platform Harvest

675’ depth | 35,150 tons

Platform Hermosa

603’ depth | 30,868 tons

We believe exceptional performance in the West Coast Decommissioning Program will be achieved by true collaboration of Chevron functional experts and partners who come together as “one team”, and with genuine relationships with our communities and regulatory agencies that are built on transparency, respect and earned trust.

working with regulatory agencies

The success of the West Coast Decommissioning Program relies on strong, transparent relationships with local, state and federal agencies to ensure the safety of all workers as well as the protection of the surrounding environment and nearby communities.

The federal Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, will coordinate with other federal and state agencies to review and approve the proposed offshore decommissioning work.

investing in communities

The nearby towns and citizens are some of our most important stakeholders in the West Coast Decommissioning Program. So, we’re investing back in them by supporting programs that help power their communities.

frequently asked questions

The plan development, review and subsequent permitting processes are expected to take several years to complete.
It is dependent on when we can secure the permits. We need to finalize engineering and disposal analyses prior to finalizing our platform removal application.
Our lease conditions under federal regulations require full removal to 15 feet below the mudline. However, we are reviewing options under state law for decommissioning the platforms and related facilities.
No, Chevron has no intention to produce oil from the platforms. The platforms are currently shut in and we are actively abandoning the wells.
Chevron has retained a local third-party contractor to maintain the SCU platforms and facilities in a safe and idle condition while the decommissioning planning and permitting effort is underway. Long term staffing and management needs are still being evaluated.
We will be working with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) to conduct an Environmental Impact Study under The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process to evaluate environmental impacts. Chevron is dedicated to preserving a robust and diverse natural environment wherever we operate.

Published: September 2020